Text Box: The Troy Family Website

Jersey. Channel Islands, Great Britain

 

About Jersey

Troy family history

My family

Our home

Our horses & animals

Morris Minors & Vmax

E.Troy Ltd

The occupation years

Shuttlers Badminton

Interesting snippets

Contact us

What's New

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Text Box: Troy Family

©Troy Family publications 2001-18

All rights reserved

 

 

Updated every 3 months.

Last update April 2018

 

Jersey

June 18

Website administrator Maurice R. Troy

If you have any comments you would like to add about anything on this website please contact the website administrator.

 

 

 

maurice@troyfamily.co.uk

New started

 

My New Zealand

 

Troy Family website

 

www.troyfamily.co.nz

Text Box: Troy family history( page 4)

Website administrator Maurice R. Troy

Edward Troy 1860-1924   Sarah Troy 1862-1925

Text Box: American Troy casualties of the Korean war
And who are buried overseas.
Text Box: Above: This is  part of the American war cemetery at Colleville-sur-Mer in Normandy France.

Carl Kevin Troy

McAlester, Oklahoma

Born April 17, 1930

Private First Class, U.S. Army
Service Number 18172855
Killed in Action
Died February 18, 1952 in Korea

Private First Class Troy was a squad leader with Company E, 2nd Battalion, 17th Infantry Regiment, 7th Infantry Division. On February 18, 1952, he was leading his squad in an attack on a heavily fortified enemy position on "Heartbreak Ridge" in North Korea, when he fell and injured his leg. He refused evacuation and continued the charge until he was killed by small arms fire. For his leadership and valor, Private First Class Troy was awarded the Silver Star, the Purple Heart, the Combat Infantryman's Badge, the Korean Service Medal, the United Nations Service Medal, the National Defense Service Medal, the Korean Presidential Unit Citation and the Republic of Korea War Service Medal.

 

~~~~

 

George Francis Troy

 

Queens, New York

Born 1931

Corporal, U.S. Army
Service Number 12322160
Killed in Action
Died December 11, 1950 in Korea

Corporal Troy was a member of the 23rd Infantry Regiment, 2nd Infantry Division. He was Killed in Action while fighting the enemy in North Korea on December 11, 1950. Corporal Troy was awarded the Purple Heart, the Combat Infantryman's Badge, the Korean Service Medal, the United Nations Service Medal, the National Defense Service Medal, the Korean Presidential Unit Citation and the Republic of Korea War Service Medal.

 

 

~~~

 

Joel James Troy

Memphis, Tennessee

Born 1930

Corporal, U.S. Army
Service Number 25263447
Killed in Action
Died September 23, 1951 in Korea

Corporal Troy was a member of Battery C, 196th Field Artillery Battalion, X Corps. He was Killed in Action while fighting the enemy near Kajon-ni, North Korea on September 23, 1951. Corporal Troy was awarded the Purple Heart, the Korean Service Medal, the United Nations Service Medal, the National Defense Service Medal, the Korean Presidential Unit Citation and the Republic of Korea War Service Medal.

 

~~~

 

 

Joseph W. Troy

Merrimack, New Hampshire

Born 1927

Private, U.S. Army
Service Number 51156149
Killed in Action
Died June 10, 1953 in Korea

Private Troy was a medic with the Medical Company, 15th Infantry Regiment, 3rd Infantry Division. He was Killed in Action while tending his wounded comrades in North Korea on June 10, 1953. Private Troy was awarded the Purple Heart, the Combat Medical Badge, the Korean Service Medal, the United Nations Service Medal, the National Defense Service Medal, the Korean Presidential Unit Citation and the Republic of Korea War Service Medal.

 

 

~~~

 

 

Lawrence E. Troy

Luzerne, Pennsylvania

Born 1930

Private First Class, U.S. Army
Service Number 13311914
Killed in Action
Died August 18, 1950 in Korea

Private First Class Troy was a member of the 34th Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division. He was Killed in Action while fighting the enemy in South Korea on August 18, 1950. Private First Class Troy was awarded the Purple Heart, the Combat Infantryman's Badge, the Korean Service Medal, the United Nations Service Medal, the National Defense Service Medal, the Korean Presidential Unit Citation and the Republic of Korea War Service Medal.

 

 

~~~~

No photo available

Joel James Troy.

"When it comes time to die, be not like those whose hearts are filled with the fear of death, so when their time comes they weep and pray for a little more time to live their lives over again in a different way. Sing your death song, and die like a hero going home."

 

Quote from:

 

Chief Aupumut, Mohican. 1725

Text Box: Unfortunately death is all around us.

 Statistics  tell us 59 million people die every year, that’s an average of 2 every second. 

One person dies as a war victim every 102 seconds.

One person is murdered every 61 seconds.

One person commits suicide every 39 seconds.

One person dies in a traffic accident every 26 seconds.

One person dies from hunger-related causes every three seconds.

One child under the age of five dies every three seconds.


“Death is the most terrible of all things for it is the end”.—Aristotle.

76 young men of the 2nd Battalion of the Jersey Militia.

Last view of Jersey before boarding the steamer watched by well wishers.

Band playing at Jersey’s Fort Regent

Led by bandsmen with drums the 1st Devonshire's descend from Mount Bingham and march to the Victoria pier in 1914

A parade in the Royal Square St Helier about 1910 to award medals

The 2nd Battalion ,Kings Own Royal Regiment on a Coronation parade at Fort Regent 1910

Jersey Militia in 1917 preparing with their machine guns.

Some World War 1 photos taken in Jersey

When the power of love overcomes the love of power, we shall have peace.

 

 

Facts about Gallipoli in WW2

 

Far more British soldiers fought on the Gallipoli peninsula than Australians and New Zealanders put together.

 

The UK lost four or five times as many men in the brutal campaign as her imperial Anzac contingents. The French also lost more men than the Australians.

 

The Aussies and Kiwis commemorate Gallipoli ardently, and understandably so, as their casualties do represent terrible losses both as a proportion of their forces committed and of their small populations.